Becoming a Grief Counselor: Job Description & Salary Information

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What are the pros and cons of a career as a grief counselor? Get real job descriptions and salary info to see if becoming a grief counselor is the right career for you.
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Pros and Cons of a Grief Counselor Career

Grief counselors, also called bereavement counselors or coordinators, support the dying and bereaved. Learn about the pros and cons of a career in grief counseling below.

Pros of a Career as a Grief Counselor
Bright job outlook for those with professional backgrounds related to grief counseling (average job growth of 12% predicted for psychologists, faster-than-average growth of 19% for social workers and much-faster-than average growth of 29% for mental health counselors and marriage and family therapists)*
Professional certification programs available that provide continuing education and demonstrate your specific qualifications as a grief counselor to potential employers**
Professional and personal satisfaction found in listening to, educating, supporting and advocating for people experiencing loss**
Variety of practice settings (funeral homes, hospices, acute-care facilities and social services agencies are some of the places grief counselors work)**

Cons of a Career as a Grief Counselor
Minimum of a master's degree often required for professional grief counselors*
Salaries tend toward the middle of the road despite the educational costs for career entry (mental health counselors, for example, earned a median salary of about $41,000, compared with the median across all occupations, which is around $36,000; meanwhile, the average salary for a mental health counselor is about $44,000, compared with $47,000 across all occupations)*
Stress may be experienced from daily encounters with people experiencing sometimes severe manifestations of grief*
Working evenings and weekends may be required*

Sources: *U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, **American Academy of Grief Counseling.

Career Information

Job Description and Duties

You may practice grief counseling under different job titles, as well as levels and types of training. Medical social workers, for example, may be on hand at hospitals to provide support, referrals and services to the bereaved. As a medical social worker, you may provide short-term therapy and refer people to bereavement support groups facilitated by chaplains. Volunteers associated with these groups are also likely to receive basic training in grief counseling and assist in support group facilitation and follow-up services. Additionally, counselors practicing in a variety of settings - like hospitals, schools and jails - may complete specialized training in assisting clients experiencing different kinds of loss.

Hospices and acute care facilities are among the types of employers more likely to hire professionals with the specific job title of grief or bereavement counselor. Typically, employers seeking grief or bereavement counselors seek applicants who meet state licensure requirements as social workers, mental health counselors or psychologists. Licensure in these mental health fields enables you to provide therapy to people who may be experiencing normal or atypical grief symptoms. In addition to providing individual and group therapy, your duties may include coordination of interns and volunteers, community outreach and program evaluation.

Job Prospects and Salary Info

Though job outlook and salary data aren't available specifically for grief counselors from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), the BLS does collect this data for related qualifying professions of marriage and family therapist (MFT), mental health counselor, psychologist and clinical social worker. The BLS groups MFTs and mental health counselors together and predicted them to experience collectively a 29% increase in job growth from 2012-2022, which is much faster than average. The BLS also expected faster-than-average job growth for social workers at 19% and average growth for psychologists at 12% during the same decade. Population growth and increasing numbers of people seeking treatment for mental health issues is fueling job growth in mental health fields.

According to a May 2014 BLS report, mental health counselors earned a median salary of about $41,000, while MFTs, social workers and psychologists earned, respectively, about $48,000, $59,000 and $69,000. Salary.com collects wage data for professions within the grief counseling field, specifically bereavement coordinator and home care bereavement services director. Bereavement coordinators provide survivors with counseling services to cope with the loss of loved ones, while bereavement services directors train grief or bereavement counselors, as well as design and direct counseling programs. According to 2015 figures gathered by Salary.com, bereavement coordinators earned a median salary of about $56,000, while directors earned roughly $56,000.

What Are the Requirements?

Though some employers hire grief counselors with training at the bachelor's degree level, a review of job posts for grief and bereavement counselors during August 2012 revealed that many employers seek to hire licensed mental health professionals in fields like social work, marriage and family therapy, mental health counseling or psychology. Specific licensure requirements vary by state and by occupation. Qualification for licensure as a clinical social worker, MFT or mental health counselor requires completion of an accredited master's degree program; clinical and psychologists need to earn a doctorate in psychology.

You can gain specialized knowledge in grief counseling through your degree program. Loss and grief are universal human experiences, which mental health professionals examine throughout their professional training and coursework. Some programs in psychology, social work and counseling may also provide you with opportunities to complete concentrations in loss and grief. In addition to coursework in psychology, counseling and social work degree programs, you may consider specialized certificate programs in grief counseling. Among the topics you may encounter in these programs are multicultural perspectives on grief and loss, facilitation of support groups, spiritual dimensions of grief, trauma and art therapy.

Useful Professional Attributes

Your training in clinical or counseling psychology, clinical social work or mental health counseling will provide you with counseling theories and methods useful for grief counselors. In addition to this training, some qualities and skills are essential to success in this field. Compassion and empathy for clients in painful situations combined with strong listening skills are especially important. You also need good people skills as a grief counselor to work well with diverse clients and colleagues. Furthermore, time-management and problem-solving skills serve you to manage case loads and to determine solutions to complex client issues.

Job Postings from Real Employers

Most job posts for grief or bereavement counselors come from hospices or home care agencies seeking professionals to provide a variety of services, including individual or group counseling, volunteer training and community outreach. Generally, licensure as a mental health professional is required to provide therapy as a grief counselor; however, some hospices seek grief counselors with bachelor's degrees who provide more general support services. Following is a sample of job postings for grief or bereavement counselors from actual employers during August 2012.

  • A Virginia hospice seeks a bereavement counselor to provide support and education to patients and family members, as well as supervise volunteers. Candidates need a bachelor's degree, proficiency in office productivity software and at least two years' experience working with the terminally ill and their families.
  • A Florida hospice seeks a bereavement counselor with advanced clinical skills to provide individual and group therapy. Additional duties include designing and implementing supportive care programs, community education and patient advocacy. A master's degree is required in social work, counseling or psychology, in addition to specific training in thanatology (the study of death and dying), grief resolution and crisis intervention.
  • A Massachusetts hospice is looking for a bereavement counselor to plan and coordinate grief support groups, as well as assess clients for individual and group therapy. This job involves facilitating adult and family bereavement support groups and planning community grief workshops. Qualifications for this position include licensure as a clinical social worker.

How to Stand Out

You can take steps while pursuing your graduate degree in clinical social work, counseling or psychology to become an outstanding candidate for a grief counselor position on graduation. In addition to completing coursework or a concentration in grief counseling, you may consider gaining valuable hands-on experience in the field by choosing to complete required internships at hospices or home care agencies. Most employers are seeking applicants with experience working with clients with terminal illness and providing bereavement support services, which you can acquire while pursuing a degree.

Continuing Education and Professional Certification

Completing continuing education and earning professional certification in grief counseling can also impress potential employers. The American Institute of Health Care Professionals (AIHCP), for example, offers a 4-course continuing education program in grief counseling to eligible professionals through its American Academy of Grief Counseling, which leads to certification. Among eligible candidates are licensed social workers and psychologists, registered nurses, pastoral counselors and licensed funeral directors. Specialized certifications are available through the AIHCP in child and adolescent grief counseling, pet loss grief recovery and Christian grief counseling.

The Association for Death Education and Counseling (ADEC) also offers professional certification at beginning and advanced levels to those who meet experience and education requirements in the areas of death education and grief counseling. You're required to pass an exam for certification at each level and complete continuing education to maintain your certification. If you choose to become a member of this interdisciplinary organization, you also have access to professional development opportunities, like self-study courses, webinars and conferences. Additional certification and professional development opportunities, including courses specific to grief and loss issues, may be available through membership in professional associations for licensed clinical social workers, psychologists and mental health counselors.

Other Careers to Consider

Several careers, some previously discussed, overlap with grief counseling. As a clinical social worker or mental health counselor, rather than a specialized grief or bereavement counselor, you work with clients experiencing broader forms loss and grief, like job loss or divorce. Nurses, school counselors, chaplains and funeral directors, among other professionals, engage in grief counseling as one of their professional roles. These are additional careers worth considering if you're interested in grief counseling, depending on what level and in which capacity you wish to support people experiencing loss and grief.

Popular Schools

  • Online Programs Available
    1. Grand Canyon University

    Program Options

    Doctorate
      • Ph.D. in General Psychology - Performance Psychology
      • Doctor of Philosophy in Counselor Education and Supervision
      • EdD in Organizational Leadership - Health Care Administration
    Master's
      • M.S. in Mental Health and Wellness with Emphasis in Grief and Bereavement
      • M.S. in Mental Health and Wellness with Emphasis in Prevention
      • Master in Christian Counseling
      • Master in Christian Counseling of Substance Use & Addictive Disorders
      • MS in Addiction Counseling
      • M.S. in Mental Health and Wellness
    Bachelor's
      • BS in Counseling - Addiction, Chemical Dependency, and Substance Abuse
      • BS in Health Care Administration
      • BS in Health Sciences: Professional Development & Advanced Patient Care
      • Bachelor of Science in Behavioral Health Science
  • Online Programs Available
    2. Saint Leo University

    Program Options

    Bachelor's
      • BA: Psychology - Clinical/Counseling
  • Online Programs Available
    3. Purdue University Global

    Program Options

    Master's
      • Master: Psychology/Applied Behavioral Analysis
      • Master: Psychology/Addictions
      • Master of Healthcare Admin
      • MS in Nursing
      • MS in Educational Psychology
    Bachelor's
      • BS in Psychology in Addictions
      • Bachelor: Health and Wellness
      • Bachelor: Health Science
    Certificate
      • Graduate Certificate in Addictions
  • Online Programs Available
    4. Colorado Christian University

    Program Options

    Master's
      • Counseling, M.A.
      • Counseling, M.A. Online
    Bachelor's
      • Psychology, B.S. - Emphasis in Clinical Counseling
  • Online Programs Available
    5. Regent University

    Program Options

    Doctorate
      • Ph.D. in Counseling & Psychological Studies
      • Ph.D. in Counseling & Psychological Studies - Grief Counseling
      • Ph.D. in Counseling & Psychological Studies - Human Services Counseling
      • Ph.D. in Counseling & Psychological Studies - Human Services/Student Affairs
      • Ph.D. in Counseling & Psychological Studies - International
      • Ph.D. in Counseling & Psychological Studies - Research Concentration
    Master's
      • M.A. in Clinical Mental Health Counseling
      • M.S. in General Psychology
      • Master of Arts in Human Services Counseling
      • Master of Arts in Organizational Leadership - Coaching and Mentoring
      • Master of Arts in Pastoral Counseling
      • M.A. in Marriage, Couple & Family Counseling
    Bachelor's
      • Bachelor of Science in Psychology - Clinical and Counseling Psychology
  • Online Programs Available
    6. Herzing University

    Program Options

    Master's
      • MBA Dual Concentration: Healthcare Management and Public Safety Leadership
      • MBA Dual Concentration: Healthcare Management and Project Management
  • Online Programs Available
    7. Northcentral University

    Program Options

    Doctorate
      • PhD in Psychology - Mental Health Policy and Practice
      • PhD in Psychology - Trauma & Disaster Relief
      • PhD in Marriage & Family Therapy - Therapy with Military Families
      • PhD in Marriage & Family Therapy - General
      • PhD in Marriage & Family Therapy - Couple Therapy
      • PhD in Marriage & Family Therapy - Medical Family Therapy
    Master's
      • M.A. in Marriage & Family Therapy
      • MAMFT - Child & Adolescent Family Therapy
      • MAMFT - LGBTQ Couple & Family Therapy
      • MAMFT - Military Family Therapy
      • Master of Arts in Psychology - Marriage and Family Therapy
      • MS - Organizational Leadership: Health Care Administration
  • Online Programs Available
    8. Abilene Christian University

    Program Options

    Master's
      • Master of Marriage and Family Therapy
      • Master of Marriage and Family Therapy - Medical Family Therapy
      • Master of Marriage and Family Therapy - Child & Adolescent Therapy
      • Master of Marriage and Family Therapy - Therapy with Military Families
      • Master of Marriage and Family Therapy - Treatment of Trauma
      • MBA - Healthcare Administration
  • Online Programs Available
    9. University of the Southwest

    Program Options

    Master's
      • MSEd - Mental Health Counseling
      • MBA Healthcare Administration
  • Campus and Online Programs
    10. South College

    Program Options

    Bachelor's
      • Bachelor of Science in Health Science with a Concentration in Magnetic Resonance Imaging
      • Bachelor of Science in Health Science with a Concentration in Computed Tomography
    Associate's
      • Associate of Science in Health Science

Featured Schools

Grand Canyon University

  • Ph.D. in General Psychology - Performance Psychology
  • M.S. in Mental Health and Wellness with Emphasis in Grief and Bereavement
  • BS in Counseling - Addiction, Chemical Dependency, and Substance Abuse

What is your highest level of education?

Saint Leo University

  • BA: Psychology - Clinical/Counseling

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Purdue University Global

  • Master: Psychology/Applied Behavioral Analysis
  • BS in Psychology in Addictions
  • Graduate Certificate in Addictions

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Colorado Christian University

  • Counseling, M.A.
  • Counseling, M.A. Online
  • Psychology, B.S. - Emphasis in Clinical Counseling

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Regent University

  • Ph.D. in Counseling & Psychological Studies
  • M.A. in Clinical Mental Health Counseling
  • Bachelor of Science in Psychology - Clinical and Counseling Psychology

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Herzing University

  • MBA Dual Concentration: Healthcare Management and Public Safety Leadership
  • MBA Dual Concentration: Healthcare Management and Project Management

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Northcentral University

  • PhD in Psychology - Mental Health Policy and Practice
  • PhD in Psychology - Trauma & Disaster Relief
  • M.A. in Marriage & Family Therapy
  • MAMFT - Child & Adolescent Family Therapy

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Abilene Christian University

  • Master of Marriage and Family Therapy
  • Master of Marriage and Family Therapy - Medical Family Therapy
  • Master of Marriage and Family Therapy - Child & Adolescent Therapy

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